Angebote zu "Doctrine" (7 Treffer)

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Der Rückzug vom organisierten Kapitalmarkt (Del...
214,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

[Withdrawal from the Organized Capital Market (Delisting). A simultaneous investigation into investor protection under capital market law in relation to shareholder protection under corporate law based on the interpretation of Section 38 IV German Securities Act (Börsengesetz)] Voluntary withdrawal from the organized capital market (delisting) is the subject of intense discussion. The discussion is primarily rooted in the Macrotron decision of the German FederalSupreme Court, the importance of which extends far beyond that case. Based on his experience gained in his corporate law practice and his work for an exchange regulatory authority, the author develops approaches for interpreting and solving the dogmatic and practical problems raised by this decision, by already taking into account the German Corporate Integrity and Modernization of Investor Protection Act (Gesetz zur Unternehmensintegrität und Modernisierung des Anfechtungsrechts - UMAG) and the Capital Investor Representative Proceedings Act (Kapitalanleger-Musterverfahrensgesetz - KapMuG). The author thus places delisting in the context of the European competition between the exchanges or between exchange and non-exchange securities markets while giving consideration to current developments in European capital market law and the treatment of delisting in other countries. The core of the article is coping with the juxtaposition of corporate and capital market regulations as well as remedies from an overarching view of exchange, takeover, and corporate law. The author develops a concept for handling this problem, which, beyond delisting, can enrich the understanding of the relationship between corporate and capital market law. The results of this reflection, as well as considerations of constitutional doctrine, thus give cause to critically question the FederalSupreme Court's Macrotron decision.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Piercing the Corporate Veil
26,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: A (1,0), New York University School of Law, language: English, abstract: Corporate law aims at protecting shareholders from being subject to personal liability for the risks of conducting business. The state created a corporate fiction which is a separate legal entity and distinctive from the shareholders and which offers the primary advantage of limited share-holder liability. The underlying notion is to encourage shareholders to provide capital and take on risky investments. In this way, the risk is shifted towards third parties and costs are external-ized. Overall, this investor attitude encourages economic development. Hence, limited liability can be seen as the 'cornerstone of capitalism'. However, as moral hazard comes into play, the externalization costs might exceed the benefits and, thus, damage third parties. In order to pro-mote justice, the presumption of limited liability must be occasionally rebutted and personal li-ability imposed on shareholders. This concept known as piercing the corporate veil will be elabo-rated on in detail in this paper. The doctrine is of crucial importance since it is the most litigated issue in corporate law. Regrettably, it is also among the most confusing areas of law. ''Pierc-ing' seems to happen freakishly. Like lightening, it is rare, severe, and unprincipled.' The objective of this paper is to lift the confusion of the doctrine and answer the question whether piercing the corporate veil is a sound concept. Moreover, it will be analyzed whether it is the pre-vailing alternative in dealing with the moral hazard problem of limited liability. Therefore, Part I will start with an explanation of piercing and the historical development of the doctrine. Competing doctrines of piercing will be presented and form the basis for the subsequent analysis of the main

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Piercing the Corporate Veil
15,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: A (1,0), New York University School of Law, language: English, abstract: Corporate law aims at protecting shareholders from being subject to personal liability for the risks of conducting business. The state created a corporate fiction which is a separate legal entity and distinctive from the shareholders and which offers the primary advantage of limited share-holder liability. The underlying notion is to encourage shareholders to provide capital and take on risky investments. In this way, the risk is shifted towards third parties and costs are external-ized. Overall, this investor attitude encourages economic development. Hence, limited liability can be seen as the 'cornerstone of capitalism'. However, as moral hazard comes into play, the externalization costs might exceed the benefits and, thus, damage third parties. In order to pro-mote justice, the presumption of limited liability must be occasionally rebutted and personal li-ability imposed on shareholders. This concept known as piercing the corporate veil will be elabo-rated on in detail in this paper. The doctrine is of crucial importance since it is the most litigated issue in corporate law. Regrettably, it is also among the most confusing areas of law. ''Pierc-ing' seems to happen freakishly. Like lightening, it is rare, severe, and unprincipled.' The objective of this paper is to lift the confusion of the doctrine and answer the question whether piercing the corporate veil is a sound concept. Moreover, it will be analyzed whether it is the pre-vailing alternative in dealing with the moral hazard problem of limited liability. Therefore, Part I will start with an explanation of piercing and the historical development of the doctrine. Competing doctrines of piercing will be presented and form the basis for the subsequent analysis of the main requirements for piercing. To illustrate the application of the doctrine, Part II will discuss four landmark cases. In Part III, the interplay of limited liability and veil-piercing will be as-sessed in different contexts of law. Afterwards, Part IV will elaborate the suitability of the con-cept compared to different alternatives. Finally, a conclusion will be drawn and the initial ques-tion will be answered. [...]

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Piercing the Corporate Veil
15,50 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: A (1,0), New York University School of Law, language: English, abstract: Corporate law aims at protecting shareholders from being subject to personal liability for the risks of conducting business. The state created a corporate fiction which is a separate legal entity and distinctive from the shareholders and which offers the primary advantage of limited share-holder liability. The underlying notion is to encourage shareholders to provide capital and take on risky investments. In this way, the risk is shifted towards third parties and costs are external-ized. Overall, this investor attitude encourages economic development. Hence, limited liability can be seen as the 'cornerstone of capitalism'. However, as moral hazard comes into play, the externalization costs might exceed the benefits and, thus, damage third parties. In order to pro-mote justice, the presumption of limited liability must be occasionally rebutted and personal li-ability imposed on shareholders. This concept known as piercing the corporate veil will be elabo-rated on in detail in this paper. The doctrine is of crucial importance since it is the most litigated issue in corporate law. Regrettably, it is also among the most confusing areas of law. ''Pierc-ing' seems to happen freakishly. Like lightening, it is rare, severe, and unprincipled.' The objective of this paper is to lift the confusion of the doctrine and answer the question whether piercing the corporate veil is a sound concept. Moreover, it will be analyzed whether it is the pre-vailing alternative in dealing with the moral hazard problem of limited liability. Therefore, Part I will start with an explanation of piercing and the historical development of the doctrine. Competing doctrines of piercing will be presented and form the basis for the subsequent analysis of the main

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Der Rückzug vom organisierten Kapitalmarkt (Del...
109,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

[Withdrawal from the Organized Capital Market (Delisting). A simultaneous investigation into investor protection under capital market law in relation to shareholder protection under corporate law based on the interpretation of Section 38 IV German Securities Act (Börsengesetz)] Voluntary withdrawal from the organized capital market (delisting) is the subject of intense discussion. The discussion is primarily rooted in the Macrotron decision of the German FederalSupreme Court, the importance of which extends far beyond that case. Based on his experience gained in his corporate law practice and his work for an exchange regulatory authority, the author develops approaches for interpreting and solving the dogmatic and practical problems raised by this decision, by already taking into account the German Corporate Integrity and Modernization of Investor Protection Act (Gesetz zur Unternehmensintegrität und Modernisierung des Anfechtungsrechts - UMAG) and the Capital Investor Representative Proceedings Act (Kapitalanleger-Musterverfahrensgesetz - KapMuG). The author thus places delisting in the context of the European competition between the exchanges or between exchange and non-exchange securities markets while giving consideration to current developments in European capital market law and the treatment of delisting in other countries. The core of the article is coping with the juxtaposition of corporate and capital market regulations as well as remedies from an overarching view of exchange, takeover, and corporate law. The author develops a concept for handling this problem, which, beyond delisting, can enrich the understanding of the relationship between corporate and capital market law. The results of this reflection, as well as considerations of constitutional doctrine, thus give cause to critically question the FederalSupreme Court's Macrotron decision.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot
Piercing the Corporate Veil
12,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject Law - Civil / Private / Trade / Anti Trust Law / Business Law, grade: A (1,0), New York University School of Law, language: English, abstract: Corporate law aims at protecting shareholders from being subject to personal liability for the risks of conducting business. The state created a corporate fiction which is a separate legal entity and distinctive from the shareholders and which offers the primary advantage of limited share-holder liability. The underlying notion is to encourage shareholders to provide capital and take on risky investments. In this way, the risk is shifted towards third parties and costs are external-ized. Overall, this investor attitude encourages economic development. Hence, limited liability can be seen as the 'cornerstone of capitalism'. However, as moral hazard comes into play, the externalization costs might exceed the benefits and, thus, damage third parties. In order to pro-mote justice, the presumption of limited liability must be occasionally rebutted and personal li-ability imposed on shareholders. This concept known as piercing the corporate veil will be elabo-rated on in detail in this paper. The doctrine is of crucial importance since it is the most litigated issue in corporate law. Regrettably, it is also among the most confusing areas of law. ''Pierc-ing' seems to happen freakishly. Like lightening, it is rare, severe, and unprincipled.' The objective of this paper is to lift the confusion of the doctrine and answer the question whether piercing the corporate veil is a sound concept. Moreover, it will be analyzed whether it is the pre-vailing alternative in dealing with the moral hazard problem of limited liability. Therefore, Part I will start with an explanation of piercing and the historical development of the doctrine. Competing doctrines of piercing will be presented and form the basis for the subsequent analysis of the main requirements for piercing. To illustrate the application of the doctrine, Part II will discuss four landmark cases. In Part III, the interplay of limited liability and veil-piercing will be as-sessed in different contexts of law. Afterwards, Part IV will elaborate the suitability of the con-cept compared to different alternatives. Finally, a conclusion will be drawn and the initial ques-tion will be answered. [...]

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 26.02.2020
Zum Angebot